Hormonal injections, implants and patches

If you do not want to take a pill or find it hard to remember to do so each day, there are alternative forms of hormonal contraceptive. These can take the form of injections, implants (where a small, flexible hormone releasing rod is placed under the skin) and patches (similar to the nicotine patches, but these release hormones rather than nicotine).

All of them work in similar ways to the combined pill, by preventing ovulation and by altering the lining of the uterus or the thickness of the cervical mucus in order to prevent pregnancy.

Advantages Disadvantages
Like the above, highly effective Need to be given by Nurse or Doctor
Injections may last for up to 12 weeks; not affected by other medications Might not be suitable if there is a history of heart disease/breast cancer
Implants may last for 2/3 years Offer no protection against sexually transmitted disease
May be used whilst breast feeding Injections have been associated with osteoporosis; not suitable for young women where bone growth is incomplete. On cessation of treatment, may take some time for fertility to return to normal.
  Patches can sometimes cause irritation (also visible)

Comments on this article

John 24 January, 2013

Does hormonal injection cause temperature changes&for how long does fertility returns to normal

John 24 January, 2013

Does hormonal injection cause temperature changes&for how long does fertility returns to normal

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